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Rodmax

saddlebagging tools/spare parts?

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What do you take as far as tools and or spare parts when travelling?  I think I go overkill , a booster pack, with complete set of sockets and wrenches 8mm-24mm , spare wheel of each size on the sled and spare bearings with the tools to change them, as well as some oil, chain case oil, antifreeze , tie wraps, hose clamps, hay wire, ductape  , rubber mallet , headlamp. with an assortment of spare nuts and bolts flagging tape , survival blanket ,flares , bungie cords , and a couple of ratchet straps. oh and an axe and a saw..   Good thing she is long and has a lot of carrying space... But I would like to cut back.  

 Thanks, Rodney

 

 

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That's a good list, i carry a fair amount of that stuff. I'm guessing you just forgot to mention various fire starting supplies. i also carry a shovel, 50' of high strength rope, volt/ohm meter, spare batteries [for gps], 3rd belt, spare helmet shield, body warmers, protein bars, fuses, relays, pliers, wire cutters, extra carbides and scratchers, and probably a few things i'm not thinking of.

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3 hours ago, scorpionbowl said:

That's a good list, i carry a fair amount of that stuff. I'm guessing you just forgot to mention various fire starting supplies. i also carry a shovel, 50' of high strength rope, volt/ohm meter, spare batteries [for gps], 3rd belt, spare helmet shield, body warmers, protein bars, fuses, relays, pliers, wire cutters, extra carbides and scratchers, and probably a few things i'm not thinking of.

I usually try to ride with Scorpionbowl he has everything. NH moose too. 

I got a leatherman tool. Lighter and extra pack of smokes. Oh and cold Jack Daniels. Good to go. 

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2 hours ago, iceman said:

I usually try to ride with Scorpionbowl he has everything. NH moose too. 

I got a leatherman tool. Lighter and extra pack of smokes. Oh and cold Jack Daniels. Good to go. 

After reading everyone's list I have come to the conclusion...... I am going to die 

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Pretty hard to predict and bring the next part that is going to fail. If you could predict you would change it before you left. At some point I looked back on my history and asked myself what tools and other items that I tote all over creation did I actually use.  Those that I did use got invited back. Most have already been mentioned.  Also if you are in a group you don't need 4 pairs of vise grips, 4 ratchet straps, 4 tow ropes, etc. You can spread it out over everyone. Like a potluck dinner. Next, what are you really going to do out in the weather, to troubleshoot, diagnose, and repair a malfunction? It's pretty hard in that environment.  You will most likely limp it in or tow it. 

Edited by easyrider

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Across the 6 guys in our group we have 1 if not 2 of most anything that would be needed.  Helps keep the bags less full.  And if we can’t fix it, then out come the straps...whose turn is it to tow?  I agree about the MasterCard.  A friend once said that there isn’t a problem that can’t be fixed if you have a big enough check book.

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9 minutes ago, scorpionbowl said:

MasterCard won’t get your dead sled out of Clova or kanawata, so at least $500 cash is a must.

Money Talks

 

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Great list so far! Topic comes up from time to time.
 

Like Scorp says, spare spare belt......applies to anything super critical ;<)

Belts and tires…..can’t do without them. If you use your 1 spare, you no longer have a spare.
 

If you carry something, it pretty much guarantees you wont need it, but someone else may, so in the end you get to help someone.....and keep the gang rolling. Your gang or anyone you run across on the trail.
 

I carry a set of motorcycle velcro-on heated grips, wired to a shield plug so anyone can use them if they lose a grip and its really cold. Learned the hard way, and have never needed them since! They roll up smaller than a soda can. Only draws about 1.5 amps, 20 watts, will (probably) not overload a shield power port.  Not really HOT like factory grips, but enough warmth to take the edge off the bars and keep you riding.
 

Energizer Lithiums are the best AA.  I try to buy items that use AA batteries, then carry 4 spare Energizer lithium cells. 2X the energy of Alkaline, better in the cold.  GPS, flashlight, head lamp, etc.

Rechargeable batteries suck in the cold.
 

Love the tiny Fenix model E12 AA flashlight! One in my jacket, one on the sled. Especially for early season trips when its dark early....or when power is out in the hotel (right Snohorse? ;<)

Adapter/cabling to charge/run USB devices off the sled , perhaps to charge a Sat Phone, GPS, cell phone, Beacon, etc.


Stretchy motorcycle cargo net. They pack small and are quick to apply to any failed baggage set up.
 

Shield tester (or even better to have the DMM Scorp mentioned).
 

Spare sled key

Spare plastic sway bar link

Spare plastic torsion spring slider.

Spare nylon buckles for whatever holds your bags to the sled.

 
Copy/PDF all your documents to yourself. Carry a spare paper copy....I use a bib pocket separate from my wallet, wallet stays in a zippered jacket pocket.

 
A quality thermos/hot water bottle filled with HOT tap water every morning at the hotel. Some folks helmet ports freeze up and warm water works great to loosen ice.  Can always drink water too. Lucky to have it mid-afternoon one time, was still warm in a Ziroshi flip top with secondary latch so it wont open or leak in your saddlebag.

 
Smoked pepperoni, beef sticks, jerky, cheese, etc. Thin sliced and divy into multiple baggies. Leave excess on the sled....its too easy to forget them in the motel refrigerator!!

 
Clothes go in 2-gallon zip locks inside a garbage bag inside your bags/luggage.

 
Packable pair of shoes for hotel/restaurant evening use.
 

Swim shorts for,the Manoir, or the occasional hot tub.
 

 

Sled prep:

Eyelets on the running boards or tunnel for a cinch strap to hold your heavy bag from bouncing. Replace the standard strap hooks with S-Biners that cannot fall off the eyelets. J-Hooks will unhook and end up in the track after a bounce.  

Aerostitch has awesome "Bungee Loops" to bolt to the running boards.
 

Wire a 2nd shield jack to the battery, it will have its own inline fuse. Tuck it away for when your sleds jack fails and its a bear to get to its wiring/fuse to troubleshoot on the trail. You end up with a pile of those cords, mount one!

 
Key lock or number/tumbler padlocks should be well oiled....2-stroke oil is good in the cold, so its good for locks too.

 
Your 6-foot sled-to-sled security chain can be covered by a nylon braid from TulsaChain (sold by the foot) in the security chain menu.  

Apply 1/2 a can of Silicone spray to it and it will stay soft and pliable in the cold and not freeze. Their chain is also the best value for a decent chain, also by the foot.
 

Gauntlets and thin gloves… Some people never get used to it, but many of us find it’s the perfect combination. Don’t need to take thin gloves off to do simple tasks. 

Wet gloves are hard to put back on too, carry spares, and spare spares.

  

Vehicle prep:

Bring your real floor jack and real spare tires. Spare spare trailer tire too!. On a Saturday afternoon or Sunday, you don't want to be scrambling looking for a tire shop in another country.  

The floor jack makes your roadside repair go fast, so less time in the roadside danger zone.

Breaker bar and correct size sockets.
 

Make sure lug nuts are not rusted on before you leave, use anti-seize (I just use wheel bearing grease) on the threads.

 
Jumper pack stays in the vehicle (good old fashioned low tech heavy lead acid battery type, not the cute lithiums…..thats just my preference).

 
Broom + shovel to clear off the trailer when you return and its buried. 

Ladder if you have a tall or flat top trailer.
 

More chain, maybe a 10 or 20 footer to lock your truck to your trailer to a pole or nearby vehicle.  Just to show some security “effort”, regardless of where you parked.

 
Buy a bunch of big arse locks at the same time, check the key code and make sure they are all the same, usually an entire tray is identical. Now you have 6 -8 locks keyed alike and a dozen+ keys :<)  

Give a key to a buddy.  

One lock for the sled, others for the vehicles.

 

Thats about it for now....

Edited by NH-Moose
Font issue

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 I carry most of the things you've been talking about. One thing I pack is self tapping metal screws in case you get a hole in your heat exchanger. Extra food and extra  booze it's better to be looking at it then looking for it 

Edited by Byrd

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1 hour ago, scorpionbowl said:

MasterCard won’t get your dead sled out of Clova or kanawata, so at least $500 cash is a must.

Domenic will get you out of Clova, believe me first hand experience LOL

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Sorting my stuff for this weekends departure, also found:

spare fuses, big and small types, variety af amperages.

Spare relay, small type for X chassis, large for older Revs.

Spare screws for HJC helmet shield, also fits other brands

Spare breath box

 

Starting to wonder if it would be easier to just drag a spare sled......... and bring 1 match ?

 

 

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Guys I noticed you seem to double bag your clothes and put them in the saddle bags.  Me and my gf use small waterproof duffel bags.  Small investment and leaves the saddlebag for stuff that stays on the sled.  I use a ratchet straps on it that the extra strap length gets rolled up inside it.  Then put a snobunje net over it for extra security.  

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11 hours ago, Byrd said:

 I carry most of the things you've been talking about. One thing I pack is self tapping metal screws in case you get a hole in your heat exchanger. Extra food and extra  booze it's better to be looking at it then looking for it 

The self tapping metal screws sound like a good idea, metal roof screws come to mind they have a washer with a rubber sealing gasket.

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Maybe I missed it being mentioned but I always use and carry gas line antifreeze. 

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