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Fuse6

Need Saddlebagging Veterans Advice on Packing

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Been going to Quebec for years with group of guys, always stayed same hotel and done day trips.

This year we are doing a five day saddlebag trip of the Gaspe

i see it as two separate needs:

1. Clothing and hotel requirements

2. Tools, safety items and others to MacGyver trail side problems.

Help me out, what to be sure to have and what really doesn't matter.

Thanks. Steve

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11 minutes ago, Fuse6 said:

Been going to Quebec for years with group of guys, always stayed same hotel and done day trips.

This year we are doing a five day saddlebag trip of the Gaspe

i see it as two separate needs:

1. Clothing and hotel requirements

2. Tools, safety items and others to MacGyver trail side problems.

Help me out, what to be sure to have and what really doesn't matter.

Thanks. Steve

That about covers it! One thing I do recomend as far as cloths go is to vacuum seal at least one set of cloths. The sealers that you use to put food in. That way if you do end up wet some how you know you will have something dry. Zip lock bags work good but they can open up in your saddle bags sometimes. My brother helpled some guys one time the ended up in a bunch of slush at a river crossing and ALL their cloths were soaked. It turned out ok but could have been really bad.

As far as Mcguyver stuff nothing beats a new Bic lighter or two in your pocket!

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Spare sled key and spare key for locks. 

Less is more....for the clothing. Fresh undies and socks but don't need a new outfit for each trail night.

 

 

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A small but good thermos or insulated water bottle, buried inside the saddlebag so it lasts longer, fill with HOT tap or coffee pot water before leaving the hotel. Good to drink, or to thaw the ice from Bombardier helmet ports. Still wet at the end of a cold day.
1.2mil garbage bag to line your saddlebag, 2 gallon zip lock Freezer bags (those are heavier duty than the storage bags)  inside with your dry stuff, don't overstuff, they flatten and pack nice. Never had one open or fail. Couple candy or energy bars, the light airy ones are easier on the teeth when frozen compared to the heavy solid ones. Put one in an inside pocket a half hour before eating. A couple dog treats or jerky for the friendly dogs you meet along the way. Change the belt before the trip if it's remotely used, so your less likely to need your spare, because then you'll have no spare. 5 or 6 foot security chain and good lock for sled-to-sled lockup to make your stuff look less attractive than the unlocked sleds nearby. Thin gloves and gauntlets for comfort and dexterity. Rain-x your shield before the trip to make freezing rain easier to clear off. At least 1 person should have a shovel, folding saw, fuse assortment, big and small ty-wraps and fresh duct tape for MacGuyvering, spare gas for whoever needs it. A volt meter is sometimes handy.  Motorcycle compact jumper cables, they always work compared to the wizbang lithium jumper packs that are hit or miss.  Flashlight with spare battery. I prefer the Fenix E12 since it's pocket size and takes 1 AA battery which is 2x capacity of AAA and it's the same battery my GPS can use in a pinch. Spare balaclava, sometimes to swap, sometimes to double up on the thin ones when it's -30, with Windblock fabric in the neck is much warmer than airy fleece, yet still thin and not bulky. Some plan in case a heated grip fails. 1 spare carbide. Bonus cinch strap ( not a bungee, they don't work good in the cold) over the saddlebags to prevent bouncing which can easily rip the factory straps out of the bags, eye bolts in the tunnel to attach. A spare strap for "that" guy that didn't plan ahead and now has torn his luggage strap out and it's really flopping around. A motorcycle cargo net is also awesome insurance! I like a combo cable bike lock to lock my jerry and permanent bag to the rear bumper, again just to add a layer of inconvenience to me or thieves. Small Leatherman for cutting belt fragments that wound up behind the primary. Spare fuses, and if Skidoo....spare relays, and know where all of them are ahead of time, on the trail in the dark when it's -30 is no time to dig out the manual. Spare helmet cord for that rare occasion you may need to plug in. Copies or PDF of all your paperwork, passport, and credit cards front and back, email to yourself. Earplugs if you're a light sleeper. Ice scratchers for those few occasional just wrong morning hours where it was groomed like concrete the night before, and it takes a couple hours to loosen up. When stopping, peek under for bent carbides or loose studs, even the pre-studded Studs pull out or can partially pull out and flap into a heat exchanger. Name and email address labels on stuff like keys, phones, bags, gps, etc.  Email always works, your phone number may not. Nice to haves include an axe, sat phone, bus schedule. Must haves are a lot of money and a good sense of humor for the inevitabilities Murphy throws your way. That's it for now ;<)

 

Edited by NH-Moose

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I recommend make copies of your truck and trailer registrations and sled registration, especially truck and trailer and have them on you. Should you return to the rig and it is gone/stolen, it makes it much easier for the police report. If your state is like Maine and has many types of license plates (ex.: Veterans, Commercial, Agriculture etc) make sure you explain that to the police. Also have another copy of insurance card you can give to other driver in case of an accident, and write your phone number on it. Carry pen/pencil and paper. 

I also carry the smaller packets that you shake and they get hot. I place one on the bottom of each boot on a cold day and they seem to keep the feet warm.

mike

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Phil 1 said it best. But I'll add and reaffirm just a couple things.

2nd credit card in case Visa didnt' get the msg you were traveling in canada

I 2nd the gauntlets.   If it's -10 and you still have 110 mi to go. I've used them more often than not and can make or break your enjoyment.

Take a picture of your passport, credit cards, drivers license and registrations (car and sled) and send to your wife or email yourself. Now you always have a copy -even if you lose your phone too.

Ability to charge your phone while riding. Your phone is a lifesaver, but only if it'll turn on. I keep mine plugged into the power outlet with the cord running to my tank bag. 

Small first aide kit

Last but not least -a headlamp. This is the only tool I carry aside from the toolkit that comes with the sled and a swiss army knife. I carry no other flashlight and it's always pointed where I want it -not where your riding partner wants to point it. Extra tools are heavy and 99% of the time unnecessary (if you have a newer sled) and take up lots of room. 

 

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14 hours ago, iceman said:

Spare sled key and spare key for locks. 

Less is more....for the clothing. Fresh undies and socks but don't need a new outfit for each trail night.

Still wondering how Jesus-Christ-Joann got that done?...

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13 hours ago, NH-Moose said:

A small but good thermos or insulated water bottle, buried inside the saddlebag so it lasts longer, fill with HOT tap or coffee pot water before leaving the hotel. Good to drink, or to thaw the ice from Bombardier helmet ports. Still wet at the end of a cold day.
1.2mil garbage bag to line your saddlebag, 2 gallon zip lock Freezer bags (those are heavier duty than the storage bags)  inside with your dry stuff, don't overstuff, they flatten and pack nice. Never had one open or fail. Couple candy or energy bars, the light airy ones are easier on the teeth when frozen compared to the heavy solid ones. Put one in an inside pocket a half hour before eating. A couple dog treats or jerky for the friendly dogs you meet along the way. Change the belt before the trip if it's remotely used, so your less likely to need your spare, because then you'll have no spare. 5 or 6 foot security chain and good lock for sled-to-sled lockup to make your stuff look less attractive than the unlocked sleds nearby. Thin gloves and gauntlets for comfort and dexterity. Rain-x your shield before the trip to make freezing rain easier to clear off. At least 1 person should have a shovel, folding saw, fuse assortment, big and small ty-wraps and fresh duct tape for MacGuyvering, spare gas for whoever needs it. A volt meter is sometimes handy.  Motorcycle compact jumper cables, they always work compared to the wizbang lithium jumper packs that are hit or miss.  Flashlight with spare battery. I prefer the Fenix E12 since it's pocket size and takes 1 AA battery which is 2x capacity of AAA and it's the same battery my GPS can use in a pinch. Spare balaclava, sometimes to swap, sometimes to double up on the thin ones when it's -30, with Windblock fabric in the neck is much warmer than airy fleece, yet still thin and not bulky. Some plan in case a heated grip fails. 1 spare carbide. Bonus cinch strap ( not a bungee, they don't work good in the cold) over the saddlebags to prevent bouncing which can easily rip the factory straps out of the bags, eye bolts in the tunnel to attach. A spare strap for "that" guy that didn't plan ahead and now has torn his luggage strap out and it's really flopping around. A motorcycle cargo net is also awesome insurance! I like a combo cable bike lock to lock my jerry and permanent bag to the rear bumper, again just to add a layer of inconvenience to me or thieves. Small Leatherman for cutting belt fragments that wound up behind the primary. Spare fuses, and if Skidoo....spare relays, and know where all of them are ahead of time, on the trail in the dark when it's -30 is no time to dig out the manual. Spare helmet cord for that rare occasion you may need to plug in. Copies or PDF of all your paperwork, passport, and credit cards front and back, email to yourself. Earplugs if you're a light sleeper. Ice scratchers for those few occasional just wrong morning hours where it was groomed like concrete the night before, and it takes a couple hours to loosen up. When stopping, peek under for bent carbides or loose studs, even the pre-studded Studs pull out or can partially pull out and flap into a heat exchanger. Name and email address labels on stuff like keys, phones, bags, gps, etc.  Email always works, your phone number may not. Nice to haves include an axe, sat phone, bus schedule. Must haves are a lot of money and a good sense of humor for the inevitabilities Murphy throws your way. That's it for now ;<)

 

In case anyone didn't get this the first time:

ALL YOU NEED IS NH MOOSE IN YOUR GANG!

And these guys do a fine job, whether renting or buying:  https://www.spdirect.com/iridium-9575-extreme-satellite-phone.html

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Just now, PLAYHARD said:

In case anyone didn't get this the first time:

ALL YOU NEED IS NH MOOSE IN YOUR GANG!

And these guys do a fine job, whether renting or buying:  https://www.spdirect.com/iridium-9575-extreme-satellite-phone.html

#NHMOOSEisMacGyver nuff said. #TeamIceman

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7 minutes ago, PLAYHARD said:

Still wondering how Jesus-Christ-Joann got that done?...

Yeah you and me both. Impressive for sure. 

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Fresh underwear and socks.

1 spare set of base layer. 1 set of extreme cold base layer.

Gauntlets in case its crazy cold (not sure where these will live on my new sled when not in use)

I extra heavy pullover for if it is extra cold.

Complete street clothes Jeans walk around shoes gloves hat and jacket.

Travel size Febreeze bottle

Swimsuit - spa nordiques is 1/2 the reason I love Quebec.

1 sealed set of underwear (not base layer) socks and gloves this stays in my sled always.  Been wet 2 times. Only use roll top dry bags for packing now.

Multi-tool of choice

Torch cigar type lighter

Baggie of collected dryer lint for firestarter

Hunting folding bone saw

Minimum toileries possible but my Sonicare goes.

Sewing kit.

Corkscrew.

Combination lock for sled

Towrope (mine is a waterski rope with handle and loops with caribeeners set just right for pulling a sled at spindles)

Factory toolkit augmented with my own complete socket set and ratchet wrenches and ball end allen keys small channel locks.

I have a spare bearing and spare headlight bulb planted in my Attak.

Small jumper cables or boost kit (you could probably skip this since there is usually a boost being done somewhere in line of sight in QC)

I keep a baggie of 1" webbing, buckles snaps etc because someone inevitably has luggage/saddlebag issues.

I carry a bunch of go pro stuff.

I have a radio shack of charging wires in my bags that goes in hotel.

Electric tape, zip ties, TYVEK tape somewhere.

I keep a small baggie of all sorts of fuses in my bibs front pocket.

I have a 2 plug charger in baggie with iPhone and micro usb in bag that stays on handlebars and goes in relais when someone needs a charge.

I am a super Mac weenie but I carry a $99 Acer 7" tablet for light browsing, email, gorpo viewing and Oruxumaps, via explorer.

Spare key.  I copy all important papers but leave that at home at my wife's disposal.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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17 hours ago, Phil 1 said:

Extra fuel and a GOOD tow strap, a sense of humor, half the clothes and twice the money...

Pack Half the clothes you think you will need.

ive been known to get more than my share of miles out of a pair of undies.

burn the tread right off them and toss them in garbage when a toxic level is reached.

 

plan in advance with ur group so ur not bringing duplicate essentials for repairs and safety.

road flares are the most effective way to start a fire if needed.

 

a good group or partner should be at the top of the list

 

#onceusaddlebagyouwontgoback

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--iPhone AND iPad or the Android equivalent with both devices mirroring each other's contacts & both recently backed up fully to the cloud.  If one device is lost, broken etc. then you still have all your contacts available in the other device.   I find my contacts are my most important security.  I never travel anywhere in the world without BOTH!

--Satellite phone (Iridium service) with 2 batteries, D.C. charging cord & plug, AC charger & phone tested prior to leaving home with one outgoing & one incoming call.

 

Edited by Florida Snowman

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Hey guys 

I just wanted to voice my opinon on 3 things that you should really pack in your bags:

FIRST

isopropyl alcohol ( Rubbing alcohol)- it does double duty-if someone  gets hurt, you can desinfect

-if you hit bad gas ( with water in it) it will act as a water/moisture remover just as gas line anti freeze ( good for 2-4 strokes carburated or injectected and diesel)

SECOND

Don't carry cables to jump someones battery.  Whent it's 35 below take off your battery and let sit inside the room for the night-next morning it will surely start.

Most of qc outfitters carry booster packs on the premises so you will not be left walking.

LAST BUT NOT LEAST

Learn a couple of key words /sentences in french

It always helps  to make contact

 

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Bringing the batterie in with you at night is a good idea. Unless you have a sled like Iceman and Florida Snowman, you will be performing an abortion in the parking lot just to get thing out.

I recommend at least one person in the group to have a small set of cables with them.

With regards to clothing, undies for each day, only one extra pair of socks needed. 

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17 hours ago, Jackstraw said:

X2 nothing worse then spending a week on the trail with an ass wipe !

 

that happened to Me ONCE ! he was never invited back

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