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iceman

Six Sledders Rescued

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A group of 10 on Lake Magog. Six went through. Fortunately all got out. 

Don’t go on Ice you don’t know, Simple no?  apparently they were warned to avoid this area but in the dark they ended up in it anyway. Then swimming. 

https://www.latribune.ca/actualites/six-motoneigistes-sauves-de-justesse-sur-le-lac-magog-photos-8171d2e8bbe7b31b881dfb11e4aa4a05?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=facebook

 

Six snowmobilers barely saved on Lake Magog [PHOTOS]


 Six snowmobilers can count themselves lucky to wake up Sunday morning, a few hours after having smashed the ice of Lake Magog.  "We were ten minutes away from losing someone [...] There were six people in the water and we could easily have had six dead," considers agent Carl Pépin of the Régie de police de Magog,  who participated in the intervention on Saturday evening.

 
 Two snowmobilers were taken to hospital, one for severe hypothermia, the other for mild hypothermia.  The event took place in the Bernard Street area.
 Two snowmobilers were taken to hospital, one for severe hypothermia, the other for mild hypothermia.  The event took place in the Bernard Street area.
 
 Two snowmobilers were taken to hospital, one for severe hypothermia, the other for mild hypothermia.  The event took place in the Bernard Street area.

 "One of the snowmobilers was hung up for 25 or 30 minutes while the firefighters could rescue him," said agent Pépin in a telephone interview with La Tribune.  Four snowmobilers were able to extricate themselves and did not require transportation to the hospital.  "

 The group of ten snowmobilers circulated on Lake Magog and headed for the mouth of the river.  "They were warned not to go into this area, but the group leader left and the others followed," said the agent.


 Not a first

 Situations like this happen so frequently in this area that Sylvain Fontaine, a local resident for 20 years, has developed reflexes when he hears an engine on the lake in winter.  “My wife and I were sitting in front of the television.  Around 8:15 p.m., we heard snowmobile noises.  Here in the industry, when I hear engine noises, it's not normal.  We have the blinds and pick up the phone.  While my wife was calling 911, she saw a few snowmobiles dive into white water, "said the trembling man, reporting at La Tribune at 11:00 p.m. Saturday evening.

 "Other snowmobilers were fortunate enough to return quickly.  Help arrived about ten minutes later, ”said Mr. Fontaine.

 In two decades, Sylvain Fontaine has had to call for help a dozen times for similar situations.  "Sometimes it was more tragic.  Today, I hope that we will avoid having deaths.  "


 While there are many advantages to being near the shore, having to constantly call for help because snowmobilers venture into dangerous places is a big disadvantage for Mr. Fontaine.  "We hate that.  When that happens, you feel helpless.  We can't go out and help the people ourselves, I already did and I stalled in the water, "he describes, always hoping in such situations that help arrives quickly.

 Know the lake

 According to Mr. Fontaine, snowmobilers should not show up on a lake without knowing its configuration.  “There are places on the lake that are safe, but not here.  I already went to look for people a decade ago on December 31, "he recalls, obviously still under adrenaline.

 What most people do not know is that at this height of the lake, the ground is not very hollow.  "What can save the world is that there are roughly five feet of water at this height in the lake.  It’s a shoal.  When you don't know, you're in a panic.  The first reaction of humans when they sink is to think of their snowmobile.  You lose a fraction of a second, ”analyzes the man who called the emergency room again on Saturday.

 "It looks good, because a large part of the lake is completely frozen," sums up Jérôme Blais, a neighbor.  But when you get to the mouth of the river, it's not frozen at all.  When you go around in the evening or at night, you don’t see it and you fall into the water.  If you are at the bottom of Bournival Street, there is no problem.  But a few hundred meters higher is problematic.  "

 Remember that Réal Fréchette, 52, and his brother Denis, 59, died in March 2016 on Lake Magog.  The young Samuel Brisebois suffered the same fate in 2014.

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Check first video in article here. Drone footage of sleds in lake. Rode right into it.

https://ici.radio-canada.ca/nouvelle/1502580/sauvetage-lac-magog-keven-gagnon-beauchesne-motoneige

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Judging by the map it looks like they were using the lake to try get around a trail closure. The closed trail goes over the south end of the lake.  Was always slushy when I rode it 10 years ago.

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Now after watching that video I’ve asked myself, I hope I never find myself in that situation but we have all at sometime or another have crossed a slushy part of a river , a part somewhere maybe just not to wide with a little (5-8 feet of water) but land is right there . I can think of a couple of instances that wasn’t to smart but did it because shore was right there.

So I ask myself when you see these guys locking up and slowing down and breaking through. In fright or flight( and God only knows what anyone would do until your in that situation) with seeing lights on the other side do you put the hammer down and try to make it across? We all have seen sleds do it . It’s a question I’ve been asking myself lately!

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1 hour ago, snowfarmer said:

Now after watching that video I’ve asked myself, I hope I never find myself in that situation but we have all at sometime or another have crossed a slushy part of a river , a part somewhere maybe just not to wide with a little (5-8 feet of water) but land is right there . I can think of a couple of instances that wasn’t to smart but did it because shore was right there.

So I ask myself when you see these guys locking up and slowing down and breaking through. In fright or flight( and God only knows what anyone would do until your in that situation) with seeing lights on the other side do you put the hammer down and try to make it across? We all have seen sleds do it . It’s a question I’ve been asking myself lately!

Absolutely.  Would I choose to do it anymore, no, but I have been known to run open water before in my younger and less intelligent years.  I have run across open water for nearly a mile late into the snowmobile season.  But not at night.  Dark adds a whole different level of risk.  The sleds today (mine particularly being a 4 stroke) are not lovers of open water like my 2 stroke ZR's used to be.  So given your scenario and we are moving along and I see water or people braking hard and dropping in, but I see land or lights not that far across I just ride it out.  I feel that would be the safest thing given the circumstances.  not to mention if I get across I have a house to get help.  Just my choice,  Others may feel different.

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29 minutes ago, Triggerhappy said:

Absolutely.  Would I choose to do it anymore, no, but I have been known to run open water before in my younger and less intelligent years.  I have run across open water for nearly a mile late into the snowmobile season.  But not at night.  Dark adds a whole different level of risk.  The sleds today (mine particularly being a 4 stroke) are not lovers of open water like my 2 stroke ZR's used to be.  So given your scenario and we are moving along and I see water or people braking hard and dropping in, but I see land or lights not that far across I just ride it out.  I feel that would be the safest thing given the circumstances.  not to mention if I get across I have a house to get help.  Just my choice,  Others may feel different.

That’s my thoughts. I’ve never run open water so I don’t know what the sensation is like . I have a two stroke so it would be lighter. The night thing bugs me too. I also thought if you made it to the other side would your skis get caught under the ice. There has been times in the late spring and run a river after a rain , it shows open(the trail) but your scared and you pinned it at all works out fine. None the less your happy and swear you may never do that again! 

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2 hours ago, snowfarmer said:

Now after watching that video I’ve asked myself, I hope I never find myself in that situation but we have all at sometime or another have crossed a slushy part of a river , a part somewhere maybe just not to wide with a little (5-8 feet of water) but land is right there . I can think of a couple of instances that wasn’t to smart but did it because shore was right there.

So I ask myself when you see these guys locking up and slowing down and breaking through. In fright or flight( and God only knows what anyone would do until your in that situation) with seeing lights on the other side do you put the hammer down and try to make it across? We all have seen sleds do it . It’s a question I’ve been asking myself lately!

I see that the Yamaha on the ice has Quebec plate on it...I do not get it....obviously they did not know it was open water. As for crossing open water...that is a long haul right there...when we were kids 40 years ago we use to play on the pond and swamp close to home and crossed many times...and got our sleds stuck in the swamp a lot...it was all fun and games....but these big Canadian lakes are no game. We crossed the river by the bridge in Chambord at Lac St. Jean...15 years ago...with a local who went first...there was maybe 50 ft of open water..we crossed at 70mph, no big deal...but know I look back and forward to today...we just were not as smart then as we are now...it would never happen today.I hope we have seen the last of this..these guys were really lucky...and it looks like they will get the sleds back too.

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14 minutes ago, quebec bob said:

I see that the Yamaha on the ice has Quebec plate on it.

They were a group from Sherbrooke.

7 hours ago, actionjack said:

Judging by the map it looks like they were using the lake to try get around a trail closure. The closed trail goes over the south end of the lake.  Was always slushy when I rode it 10 years ago.

How did that work out? Bad move especially at night.

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1 hour ago, Triggerhappy said:

Would I choose to do it anymore, no, but I have been known to run open water before in my younger and less intelligent years. 

Many moons ago, i used to go to the Winter Carnival in Lake George and they did water skipping there. It’s been a long time but I believe was near the dock for the Paddle Wheel boat. 

Pretty nerve racking the first time leaving the solid Ice and hitting the water. After that was alot of fun. But was safety guys there and for sure not at night. I used to love it. It was a straight shot so not turning like they do in the watercross sled racing. 

I did see a couple of guys not make it mostly due to belt getting wet then you are done. 

 

 

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4 hours ago, iceman said:

(I did see a couple of guys not make it mostly due to belt getting wet then you are done.)

 My buddy from Vermont used to do grass drag and water cross at the New Hampshire grass drags and I used to help him in the pit. He was always taping up all the openings on the hood as to not let any water get near the clutch/belt.

 

 

Edited by zeusand

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16 hours ago, iceman said:

 

Many moons ago, i used to go to the Winter Carnival in Lake George and they did water skipping there. It’s been a long time but I believe was near the dock for the Paddle Wheel boat. 

Pretty nerve racking the first time leaving the solid Ice and hitting the water. After that was alot of fun. But was safety guys there and for sure not at night. I used to love it. It was a straight shot so not turning like they do in the watercross sled racing. 

I did see a couple of guys not make it mostly due to belt getting wet then you are done. 

 

 

Yup the winter carnival.  lol  yes it was around the tour boats in the village.  They keep bubblers going so not to freeze around the boats.  a lot of people run those water spots.  75' distances are actually very easy with just normal momentum.  Doing 50mph and just keeping your throttle consistent (maybe a little more) and just slide your butt back a little bit on the seat you will be across the water almost as if you were riding on ice.    The deeper the lug track the easier it is.  Light sled with a good paddle track and water not easily able to get to the belt and you can ride for miles on water.  But at night.....  that could be a whole different game.  Glad I have gained some intelligence over the last few years.  ;)

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17 hours ago, snowfarmer said:

That’s my thoughts. I’ve never run open water so I don’t know what the sensation is like . I have a two stroke so it would be lighter. The night thing bugs me too. I also thought if you made it to the other side would your skis get caught under the ice. There has been times in the late spring and run a river after a rain , it shows open(the trail) but your scared and you pinned it at all works out fine. None the less your happy and swear you may never do that again! 

If you are moving when you get to the other side and there isn't any weird ice heave or something, your skis transition back onto the ice like you hit just a tiny bump in the trail.  No problem.  Keep your skis straight and center of gravity low and you float across the water pretty smooth and easy. 

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I've read this post about riding on the water and it always  scares me a little.  I live on the St. Lawrence river and when it freezes there is usually a lot river riding. Now not all of the river freezes and there is a few boys that just love to find these places and ride their sleds on open water. This includes my oldest boy who doesn't do it as much. First it was I'll be fine and my answer was, it's not fair that I would have to come and find your body maybe. Then it was we have flotation jackets and my answer was well at least I can find your body.  Final arguement was I don't want to raise your daughter's because their dad was stupid.  Well the last reason got to him because there is no more quarter mile open water runs any more.  

  Just to tell about one of their areas, when you guys from south cross the thousands island bridge amagine looking down and seeing sleds heading to clayton on the ice below.  Oh wait, there's no ice ever.

  They call these people river rats. No one said rats were smart.  But I have been told the Ski doo outback 850 will pull its skis on open water.  

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Scooting across water would be one thing if you are headed toward a boat landing. If it's a rocky shore in the dark you will almost  certainly be killed smacking into that at WOT.

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